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  • Sir John Soane's Breakfast Room
  • Post author
    Sarah McMillan
  • architecturehistorysir john soane

Sir John Soane's Breakfast Room

Sir John Soane's Breakfast Room

Sir John Soane was the definition of an eccentric. An architect by trade, he was a successful architect in 18th/19th century London. He specialized in the Neoclassical style, and designed the Dulwich Picture Gallery and the Bank of England. He was also an avid collector of Roman, Greek and Egyptian artifacts. His collection also includes 18th Century Chinese ceramics and Peruvian pottery. He designed his home at 13 Lincoln's Inn Fields to house his collection, and today it is open to the public as a museum. 

 Sir John Soane's Breakfast Room

Image courtesy University of Brighton

His breakfast room is one of the most magical spaces in the museum. It is an intimate space with light that pours in from the domed ceiling. Mirrors punctuate the space allowing light to bounce around the room in unexpected ways. Neoclassical touches are present in the architecture, and books and architectural studies line the space. More often than not I eat breakfast in front of my computer screen checking emails. If only I could have a beautiful space like this to enjoy my breakfast, and be present. 

 Sir John Soane's Breakfast Room

Image courtesy The Londonist

The furniture is simple - around round expandable table on pad feet, and a few chairs. 

The museum is one of my favorite spaces in London. It is located on a beautiful square not far from the center. When visiting you feel like you are outside the hubbub of the main city, a feeling that I find in so many neighborhoods in London, and one that is seriously lacking in New York City. If you find yourself in London I seriously recommend a visit to this special place to see the room in person. 

Image courtesy British Library

 

  • Post author
    Sarah McMillan
  • architecturehistorysir john soane

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